Document Type

Article

Publication Date

Spring 2020

Publication Title

Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability

Volume

33

Abstract

With approximately six million people who are blind, between the ages of 16-75+ years of age in the U.S., audio description (AD) is one way to increase people with disabilities' access when visual images are involved (American Council of the Blind, 2019). Snyder (2014) described AD as a verbal description of a program (i.e., performing arts, films, cultural events). Furthermore, AD is distinct from an art label, photo caption, or an audio tour offering more than context, but actual description of the situation (Thomson, 2017). In some cases, AD is available at art and cultural museums. This paper imagines AD as a collaborative and reflexive tool for college artists, AD practitioners, blind communities, and gallery curators. This collaborative practice is important because the outcomes can increase shared access accountability, offer participating artists reflexivity, and increase the level of AD accuracy for people with visual impairments.

Issue

1

First Page

103

Last Page

107

ISSN

2379-7762

Comments

This article was published in the Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability and is deposited in the institutional repository with permission from the journal editors.

Share

COinS