Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-12-2016

Publication Title

Nineteenth-Century Contexts: An Interdisciplinary Journal

Abstract

This essay examines the implications behind the brass band movement in the nineteenth and early twentieth century in Britain. The activity was encouraged by middle-class entrepreneurs as a social improvement exercise for the working class. The music was meant to refine their taste and prevent them from engaging in less desirable recreational activities; at the same time the competitive aspect of performances was seen as the best possible means to motivate improvement in musicians. While the activity was intended to promote middle-class musical values, as competitive practices developed a distinct musical tradition with values that deviated from the middle-class tradition emerged. Through an examination of contemporary discussion on brass band contests and musical practices, Odello discusses the Victorian concepts of musical culture, athleticism, and class values that shaped this tradition as well as how people perceive the social influences of music and use those ideas to attempt to shape society.

Volume

38

Issue

2

First Page

141

Last Page

154

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1080/08905495.2015.1135368

ISSN

1477-2663

Comments

“This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Nineteenth-Century Contexts: An Interdisciplinary Journal on February 12, 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/08905495.2015.1135368.”

Rights

© 2016 Taylor & Francis

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