Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-2011

Publication Title

Dialectical Anthropology

Volume

35

Abstract

This article examines the renegotiation of gender and class in a rural Mexican community where economic crisis in the sugar industry led foreign agribusinesses to promote blackberry and raspberry production for export and hire primarily women as berry pickers. Analysis focuses on the transition from a sugar economy where mostly men worked in the cane fields to non-traditional agricultural exports when women entered agricultural waged labor in unprecedented numbers. This restructuring of the regional economy raises important questions regarding the marginalization of differentiated subaltern groups and the nature of new sets of power relations between transnational agribusinesses, berry growers, and waged workers. I analyze the contradictions of this changing social field that connects Northern consumers, transnational company executives, berry growers, and waged laborers in a web of differential power relations as they reverberate along the commodity chain from campesino households to the global market.

Issue

2

First Page

147

Last Page

169

DOI

10.1007/s10624-010-9183-9

ISSN

1573-0786

Comments

This version of the article has been accepted for publication, after peer review (when applicable) and is subject to Springer Nature’s AM terms of use, but is not the Version of Record and does not reflect post-acceptance improvements, or any corrections. The Version of Record is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10624-010-9183-9

Share

COinS