Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-2-2014

Publication Title

Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment

Volume

36

Abstract

As educators, we owe it to our students to enable them to transgress structural impediments and to create sustainable alternatives from the margins of the industrial agro-food system. Policies of assimilation, allotment, and enclosure of the Native American commons and ecosystems brought devastation to Native cultures. Dependence on government commodities replaced Native food sovereignty and contributed to malnutrition, obesity, and diabetes as diets responded to corporately produced and processed foods. Young people often feel disempowered and ask how they might confront such formidable forces as corporate control of our agro-food system, destruction of natural resources, and threats to human health. Service learning at a former Native American boarding school, now a university campus, empowered students to create a community of learning and practice that resulted in a Native American Organic Garden. Based on Native values, the garden serves the community's needs for healthy, locally produced food.

Issue

2

First Page

93

Last Page

104

DOI

10.1111/cuag.12037

ISSN

2153-9561

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript version of this published article. The final, authorized version can be accessed through the publisher's website: https://anthrosource.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/cuag.12037

The full citation for the final, published version is:

Chollett, D.L. (2014), The Native American Organic Garden: Using Service Learning as a Site of Resistance. CAFÉ, 36: 93-104. https://doi.org/10.1111/cuag.12037

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