Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-26-2015

Publication Title

The Latin Americanist

Volume

59

Abstract

This article uses the translation history of North American James Fenimore Cooper's 1826 Last of the Mohicans to explore the place of race in nineteenth-century republican discourse as it circulated in the Atlantic World. Based not on Cooper's original, but on Auguste Defauconpret's 1826 French translation, le Dernier des mohicans, Vicente Pagasartundua's 1832 Último de los mohicanos, like many republican-oriented works in the early nineteenth century, was translated in Spain for a Spanish American audience. Traveling from pre-Jacksonian New York to Orleanist Paris to absolutist Madrid, Cooper's novel and its translations participate in a transnational conversation on the role of racial hierarchies in republican government –particularly, as I will show, in regards to the question of the place of Afro-descendants in the republic, a contentious issue in the U.S., France, Spain, and Latin America as the Atlantic World faced events such as the rise of Jacksonian Democracy, the Haitian Revolution, the Cádiz Constitution, and the independence of the Spanish Main.

Issue

1

First Page

35

Last Page

46

DOI

10.1111/tla.12046

ISSN

1557-203X

Comments

This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article:

The Last of the Mohicans in Spanish: A Racialized Dialogue.” The Latin Americanist (SECOLAS Annals). 59.1 (March 2015): 35-46.

which has been published in final form at 10.1111/tla.12046. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

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