Document Type

Article

Publication Date

Winter 2014

Publication Title

Hispanic Review

Volume

82

Abstract

This article focuses on the broad sociopolitical implications of Sarmiento's translations of Northern Hemispheric texts and ideas into the South American context in Las escuelas and the author's correspondence with Mary Mann. Exploring the relationship between the two reformers—both of whom were interested in using education to prepare nonwhites for the duties of citizenship in a broadly defined "South"—in order to examine the entangled history of Argentina during the War of the Triple Alliance and the early Reconstruction-era United States, this article shows how Sarmiento puts his relationship with Mann to creative use in his effort to incorporate Argentina's popular classes into the national project through public education. Ultimately, the relationship between the two writers points to how the interplay between transnational conversations and local histories gives rise to the entanglement of imperialism and neocolonialism in the Americas during the second half of the nineteenth century.

Issue

1

First Page

21

Last Page

41

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1353/hir.2014.0001

ISSN

0018-2176

Comments

Orginally published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in Hispanic Review vol. 82, no. 1 (Winter 2014).

Rights

Copyright 2014 University of Pennsylvania Press. All rights reserved. Except for brief quotations used for purposes of scholarly citation, none of this work may be reproduced in any form by any means without written permission from the publisher. For information address the University of Pennsylvania Press, 3905 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4112

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